Who loves the Prix the most? Japan, China, South Korea, the US and Australia. Where is it always held? Switzerland

It’s time for the Prix de Lausanne to think about staging the ballet competition in the countries that have the most interest in the annual award.

For the next Prix, held in January/February 2017, there were 338 applicants from around the world. The countries with the most applicants were Japan (89), Australia (48), and the United States (45).

When the judges watched the videos sent by the dancers only 72 applicants were chosen to take part. Of these 13 are Japanese, 10 are Australians, nine from South Korea, and seven from China.

Only five of the 45 United States applicants were chosen.

Switzerland and the UK missed out altogether. There were only five Swiss applicants and five from the UK. None of them were chosen.*

When the Prix began in 1973, the competitors were all European.

By the early 1980s interest spread across the world. By 2004 Japanese dancers made up the biggest numbers.

Last year five of the nine prize winners (pictured) came from Asian countries.

The Prix travelled to New York in 1985, Tokyo in 1989 and Moscow in 1995, but as far as I know the Prix has not been staged anywhere but Lausanne in the last 21 years.

The competition relies on funds from the Canton of Vaud, from the city of Lausanne – the largest city in the canton – and from the Loterie Romande, based in Lausanne.

Together the city, canton and lottery provide more than a third of the Prix’s annual budget.

So we can see why the competition is rusted on to its original location.

However the remaining two thirds of the funding comes from sponsors, patrons and donors.

They, of course, could come from anywhere, including Japan, South Korea, China and Australia.

* From 2006 onwards, the Prix became a more elite competition that it had been in the past. For the last decade, applicants have had to send a video to be watched by the Lausanne judges.

Australians selected for the 2017 Prix

Rose Dalton, Tanya Pearson Classical Coaching Academy, Sydney

Thomas Dilley, Premiere Elite, Tuggerah, NSW

Heidi Freeman, KCs School of Dance, Warragul, VIC

Brayden Gallucci, Alegria Dance Studios, Sydney

Abby Morgan, Classical Coaching Australia, Brisbane

Joshua Jack Price, Amanda Bollinger Dance Academy, Gold Coast, QLD

Jessi Seymour, Alegria Dance Studios, Sydney

Alexander Smith, Tanya Pearson Classical Coaching Academy, Sydney

Tyla Steinbach, Tanya Pearson Classical Coaching Academy, Sydney

Isabella Wagar, Jane Moore Academy of Ballet, Melbourne

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Seu Kim, South Korea, scholarship winner Prix de Lausanne, 2016, photo © Gregory Batardon

Seu Kim, South Korea, scholarship winner Prix de Lausanne, 2016, photo © Gregory Batardon

Junnosuke Nakamura, Japan, scholarship winner Prix de Lausanne, 2016, photo © Gregory Batardon

Junnosuke Nakamura, Japan, scholarship winner Prix de Lausanne, 2016, photo © Gregory Batardon

Hang Yu, China, scholarship winner Prix de Lausanne, 2016, photo © Gregory Batardon

Hang Yu, China, scholarship winner Prix de Lausanne, 2016, photo © Gregory Batardon

Dinkai Bai, China, scholarship winner Prix de Lausanne, 2016, photo © Gregory Batardon

Dinkai Bai, China, scholarship winner Prix de Lausanne, 2016, photo © Gregory Batardon

Danbi Kim, South Korea, Prix Jeune Espoir, Prix de Lausanne, 2016, photo © Gregory Batardon

Danbi Kim, South Korea, Prix Jeune Espoir, Prix de Lausanne, 2016, photo © Gregory Batardon